Can my employer read my text messages

If texting is allowed or tolerated in the workplace, employers need to review their policies relating to employee communication and record retention to make sure texts, in additional to email, are covered.

Email Monitoring: Can Your Employer Read Your Messages?

Texting is becoming more common in the workplace. Most employees use company-owned or personal phones to communicate in the workplace to some degree, and with phones, comes texting.

Even if email is the sanctioned form of communication in the workplace, employees will text. Some employers may not even be aware their employees are texting with each other or to what extent.

Can Your Boss Spy On Your Internet Use?

Other employers may be aware and actually permit texting in the workplace or simply tolerate it because they feel they cannot prevent it from happening. Yet, if employers allow employees to text in the workplace, they will need to think about how they will access, view and preserve employee texts in the same manner that they do with emails. Plaintiff-side lawyers in employment cases are beginning to demand that text messages be produced along with emails during discovery. If the texts are made from company phones, the basis for such a request would seem to be well-founded assuming the substance of the texts is relevant to the claims and defenses in the case.

However, when the texts are sent or received on personal devices used by employees in the workplace, the issue becomes more complicated.


  • Slack updates privacy policy: Employers can read 'private' DMs without telling workers!
  • Related Posts.
  • Yes, Your Boss Is Allowed to Read Your Private Emails.
  • Email Monitoring: Can Your Employer Read Your Messages? | Nolo.

Thus, employers must grapple with how they will fulfill their legal obligations with respect to workplace texts by ensuring they have the same ability to access, view and preserve employees texts that they do with employee emails. And this need will only grow more pressing as time goes on. Some commentators say that, given the strong preferences of Generation Y for texting, texting will replace email as the primary mode of communication in the workplace of the future.

Thus, prudent employers will start thinking about this issue is now.

Can company retrieve iMessages on employee phone? | MacRumors Forums

In workplaces in which email is the primary method of communication, employee emails are usually sent, received and stored on an email server that is maintained by the employer. With the right policies in place, employers have free reign to access, review and preserve employee emails stored on these servers.

Watch Next

Once your email is processed, you will be sent an email with your text messages. This article was written by the It Still Works team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Works, contact us.

Step 1 Go to your service provider's website and open the customer service page. Step 2 Write an email to your customer service representative about why you want to retrieve your text messages. Video of the Day. Brought to you by Techwalla.

Do employees have an expectation of privacy in text messages?

However, when the texts are sent or received on personal devices used by employees in the workplace, the issue becomes more complicated. Thus, employers must grapple with how they will fulfill their legal obligations with respect to workplace texts by ensuring they have the same ability to access, view and preserve employees texts that they do with employee emails.


  • spy phone windows vista.
  • best android spy camera!
  • mobile spy free download windows 10 sp2 patch download!

And this need will only grow more pressing as time goes on. Some commentators say that, given the strong preferences of Generation Y for texting, texting will replace email as the primary mode of communication in the workplace of the future. Thus, prudent employers will start thinking about this issue is now. In workplaces in which email is the primary method of communication, employee emails are usually sent, received and stored on an email server that is maintained by the employer.

With the right policies in place, employers have free reign to access, review and preserve employee emails stored on these servers. There are many legitimate reasons for which employers need to access and view employee communications. For example, the employer may be conducting a workplace investigation or responding to a subpoena or discovery requests in litigation. Employers may also have an affirmative obligation to preserve employee communications when they are in litigation or in connection with a governmental inquiry or as required by law.

However, employers do not have ready access to employee texts and are not in a position to preserve them. Unlike emails, texts typically reside on the phones on which they are sent and received.

Why the Change?

These phones may or may not belong to the employer, but in order to access and review workplace texts, the employer must first take possession of the phone on which the text resides. Also, where texts reside only on the phones on which they are sent and received, it is much more difficult for the employer to ensure such texts are being preserved in those situations in which an employer has an affirmative duty to preserve such communications.

Setting aside the fact that phones can be lost or damaged or suffer a malfunction that makes it impossible to retrieve the texts stored on them, in order for an employer to ensure texts are being preserved, the texts need to be backed up in some way. If employees are texting on company-owned phones, it is conceivable that the employer could implement a system for automatically backing up the texts.